Feb 2018 Learning

Books Read (related to work/professional development/betterment):

Creativity, Inc.

The Mythical Man Month

Articles:

pm@olin 10 Most Likely to Succeed and pm@olin 11 Capstone

  1. “ A lot of being a PM is rolling with what doesn’t cost very much, and helps make the team happy. You don’t always get the most done by optimizing.”
  2. “For a PM, It’s figuring out how to find a little extra time for the easter egg. It’s doing the extra work to get a cool side project into the product. It’s helping someone else learn a new skill. It’s the thank you cards or the day off after shipping.”
  3. Sometimes something as simple as colored markets to annotate pros and cons helps whiteboarding

Manager Energy Drain

  1. You can color-code your calendar based on what mental energy you will need (eg. 1-on-1 brain, teaching brain, planning brain) to manage that piece and defrag accordingly
  2. The best give you can give direct reports is a messy unscoped project with a bit of safety net to teach them -> give them guidance
  3. Say no to focus energy – don’t be afraid to go back and say no

The MVP is dead. Long live the RAT.

  1. RAT = Risk Assumption Test – after MVP is not a product, but a way of testing whether you’ve found a problem worth solving. RAT emphasizes on building on what’s required to rest beyond your largest unknown
  2. All about rapid testing rather than creeping into perfect code, design, and danger of becoming a product
  3. It’s about maximizing discovery and removing temptations of putting resources on creating a more polished product

Scaling Agile At Spotify: An Interview with Henrik Kniberg

  1. “Autonomy is one of our guiding principles. We aim for independent squads that can each build and release products on their own without having to be tightly coordinated in a big agile framework. We try to avoid big projects altogether (when we can), and thereby minimize the need to coordinate work across many squads.”
  2. “By avoiding big projects, we also minimize the need to standardize our choice of tools.”
  3. The technical architecture is hugely important for the way we are organized. The organizational structure must play in harmony with the technical architecture. Many companies can’t use our way of working because their architecture won’t allow it.
    • We have invested a lot into getting an architecture that supports how we want to work (not the other way around); this has resulted in a tight ecosystem of components and apps, each running and evolving independently. The overall evolution of the ecosystem is guided by a powerful architectural vision.
    • We keep the product design cohesive by having senior product managers work tightly with squads, product owners, and designers. This coordination is tricky sometimes, and is one of our key challenges. Designers work directly with squads, but also spend at least 20% of their time working together with other designers to keep the overall product design consistent.”

Product Management Is Not Project Management

  1. Product management is not about making sure products ship on time – it’s about knowing the customer needs and defining the right product and evangelizing that internally
  2. Too often, Product Managers spend time writing specs, Gantt charts, and workflows instead of on customer problems, customer data, and articulating that to the company.
  3. Measuring Religiously means both analytics + talking to customers

When should you hire a Product Manager?

  1. Toxic things to a Product Management team: when it is too large and has overlaps in responsibility, it results in politics, land grabs for credit, and no clear owner on how t to make decisions
  2. Don’t hire until there’s a pain point – eg can’t prioritize backlog, slow shipping bc of mismatched priorities and poor communication between teams, people don’t know why they’re building what they’re building
  3. “My least favorite way to slice a Product team is “I’ll do the high level strategy and they’ll do details” — it makes it hard for the detail-level person to make good calls. It also makes it harder for the high level person to connect with the rest of the team.”

Continuous Improvement + Quality Assurance

  1. Minimum viable feature set: releasing a feature is decoupled from deploying code. Large features deployed piecemeal over time.
  2. Debugging is twice as hard as writing code in the first place. Focus less on the mitigation of large, catastrophic failures – optimize for recovery rather than failure prevention. Failure is inevitable.
  3. Exploratory testing requires an understanding of the whole system and how it serves a community of users. Customer Experience is as much about technology as it is about product requirements

Building Your Personal Brand Where You Work

  1. Make your boss aware of what you’re doing – women often doers who don’t make it a point to highlight their accomplishments or how busy they are at work. Great tool is informal email reports. Template can be: weekly wins, areas of improvement for my team, what was coming next week, what you need from boss.
  2. Build brand equity with coworkers, because you will need people to defend you. Being liked matters more sometimes. You want an ally at every level, your boss should respect you but it’s also important entry level employees respect you too.
  3. Keep track of your success, remember you wins. Eg. tracking weekly, monthly, bi-annual, annual wins

Product Manger versus Product Owner

  1. “Product Owner is a role you play on a Scrum team. Product Manager is the job”
  2. Product Owner should spend half the time talking to customers and half working with the team is an ideal but should vary. External v internal work will shift depending on maturity and success of product
  3. Product Managers in senior roles should concentrate on defining vision and strategy for teams based on market resarhc, company goals, and current state of products. The ones without Scrum teams or smaller teams can help validate or contribute to strategy fo future products.

How to Run an Effective Meeting

  1. Set the agenda so there is a compass for conversation. Start on time and tend on time.
  2. End with an action plan that has next steps.
  3. Be clear, light bulb or gun – you have an idea or you want people to do it. “Your job as a leader is to be right at the ending of the meeting, not the beginning of the meeting.” Let people speak so you’ve heard all facts and opinions.

Managing Software Engineers *This is totally an article clearly from 2002 and all problematic attitudes therein about not considering people might have things like families

  1. Create work environment where best programmers will be satisfied enough to stay and where average programmers become good
  2. “One of the paradoxes of software engineering is that people with bad ideas and low productivity often think of themselves as supremely capable. They are the last people whom one can expect to fall in line with a good strategy developed by someone else. As for the good programmers who are in fact supremely capable, there is no reason to expect consensus to form among them.”
  3. Ideals to steal
    1. people don’t do what they are told
    2. all performers get the right consequences every day
    3. small, immediate, certain consequences are better than large future uncertain ones
    4. positive reinforcement is more effective than negative reinforcement
    5. ownership leads to high productivity

The What, Why, and How of Master Data Management

  1. Five kinds of data in corporations:
    1. “Unstructured—This is data found in e-mail, white papers like this, magazine articles, corporate intranet portals, product specifications, marketing collateral, and PDF files.
    2. Transactional—This is data related to sales, deliveries, invoices, trouble tickets, claims, and other monetary and non-monetary interactions.
    3. Metadata—This is data about other data and may reside in a formal repository or in various other forms such as XML documents, report definitions, column descriptions in a database, log files, connections, and configuration files.
    4. Hierarchical—Hierarchical data stores the relationships between other data. It may be stored as part of an accounting system or separately as descriptions of real-world relationships, such as company organizational structures or product lines. Hierarchical data is sometimes considered a super MDM domain, because it is critical to understanding and sometimes discovering the relationships between master data.
    5. Master—Master data are the critical nouns of a business and fall generally into four groupings: people, things, places, and concepts. Further categorizations within those groupings are called subject areas, domain areas, or entity types. For example, within people, there are customer, employee, and salesperson. Within things, there are product, part, store, and asset. Within concepts, there are things like contract, warrantee, and licenses. Finally, within places, there are office locations and geographic divisions. Some of these domain areas may be further divided. Customer may be further segmented, based on incentives and history. A company may have normal customers, as well as premiere and executive customers. Product may be further segmented by sector and industry. The requirements, life cycle, and CRUD cycle for a product in the Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) sector is likely very different from those of the clothing industry. The granularity of domains is essentially determined by the magnitude of differences between the attributes of the entities within them.”
  2. Deciding what to manage it and how it should be managed depends on some of the following criteria: behavior (how it interacts with other data, eg customers buy product- which may be a part of multiple hierarchies describing how they’re sold), life cycle (created, read, updated, deleted, searched – a CRUD cycle), cardinality, lifetime, complexity, value, or volatility, reuse
  3. Master Data Management is the tech, tools, and processes required to create and maintain consistent and accurate lists of master data, including identifying sources of master data, analyzing metadata, appointing data stewards, data-governance program, developing master data model, toolset, infrastructure, generating and testing master data, modify producing and consuming systems, implementing maintenance processes, and creating Master List similar to ETL below:
    1. Normalize data formats
    2. Replace Missing values
    3. Stnadardize Values
    4. Map Attributes
    5. Needs versioning and auditing

Treehouse Learning:  

Object-Oriented-Javascript

  • An object is a container for values in the form of properties and functionality in the form of methods
    • Methods on values can return objects, but they don’t have to return anything at all
  • Accessing or assigning properties is known as getting and setting
  • Native Objects: no matter where your JavaScript programs are run, it will have these objects eg. number, string, object, boolean
  • Host Objects: provided by the host environment, eg. the browser, such as document, console, or element
  • Own Objects: created in own programming eg. characters in a game
  • Objects hide complexity and organize code – known as encapsulation
  • An object literal holds information about a particular thing at a given time – it stores the state of a thing.

Eg.

var person = {
            name: “Lauren”,
            treehouseStudent: true,
            “full name”: “Lauren Smith”
}

Access using dot notation or square brackets

person.name;
person.treehouseStudent;
person[“name”]
person[“treehouseStudent”]
person[“full name”]
  • Each key is actually a string, but Javascript interpreter interprets them as a string
  • Encapsulating code into a single block allows us to keep state and behaviors for a particular thing in one place and code becomes more maintainable

Adding method to an object

var contact = {
  fullName: function printFullName() {
  var firstName = "Andrew";
  var lastName = "Chalkley";
  console.log(firstName + " " + lastName);
  }
}

Anonymous Function

var contact = {
  fullName: function() {
    var firstName = "Andrew";
    var lastName = "Chalkley";
    console.log(firstName + " " + lastName);
  }
}

We don’t know the name of variable to access its properties. Depending on where and how a function is called, this can be different things. Think of this as owner of function, eg. the object of method that is called.

Eg.

var dice = {
            sides: 6,
            roll: function() {
                var randomNumber = Math.floor(Math.random() * this.sides) + 1; // this means object literal of dice in this case
                console.log(randomNumber);
            }
}

var dice10 = {
            sides: 10,
            roll: function() {
                 var randomNumber = Math.floor(Math.random() * this.sides) + 1; // refers to dice10 variable
                 console.log(randomNumber);

            }

}

Object  literals are great for one off objects, if you want to make multiple objects of one type you need constructor functions:

  • Constructor functions describe how an object should be created
  • Create similar objects
  • Each object created is known as an instance of that object type

Constructor function example and new contact instances (an instance is the specific realization of a particular type or object)

Function Contact(name, email) {
    this.name = name;
    this.email = email;
}

var contact = new Contact(“Andrew”, “andrew@andrew.com”);
var contact2 = new Contact(“Bob”, “bb@andrew.com”);

You can create as many object of same type as you like, eg. real world example of:

Media Player

  • Playlist object (initialized by constructor function)
  • Song objects
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